Wednesday, March 9, 2011

Pluto, Pluto, wherefore art thou, Pluto?


The eight planets of our solar system, this week at least, in no particular order, are:

1. Jupiter, (n.), the planet fifth in order from the sun, having an equatorial diameter of 88,729 mi. (142,796 km), a mean distance from the sun of 483.6 million mi. (778.3 million km), a period of revolution of 11.86 years, and at least 14 moons. It is the largest planet.

2. Mercury, (n.), the planet nearest the sun, having a diameter of 3031 mi. (4878 km), a mean distance from the sun of 36 million mi. (57.9 million km), and a period of revolution of 87.96 days, and having no satellites: the smallest planet in the solar system.

3. Neptune, (n.), the planet eighth in order from the sun, having an equatorial diameter of 30,200 mi. (48,600 km), a mean distance from the sun of 2794.4 million mi. (4497.1 million km), a period of revolution of 164.81 years, and two moons.

4. Saturn, (n.), the planet sixth in order from the sun, having an equatorial diameter of 74,600 mi. (120,000 km), a mean distance from the sun of 886.7 million mi. (1427 million km), a period of revolution of 29.46 years, and 21 known moons. It is the second largest planet.

5. Uranus, (n.), the planet seventh in order from the sun, having an equatorial diameter of 32,600 miles (56,460 km), a mean distance from the sun of 1,784 million miles (2,871 million km), a period of revolution of 84.07 years, and 15 moons.

6. Venus, (n.), the planet second in order from the sun, having an equatorial diameter of 7521 miles (12,104 km), a mean distance from the sun of 67.2 million miles (108.2 million km), a period of revolution of 224.68 days, and no moons. It is the most brilliant planet.

7. Mars, (n.), the planet fourth in order from the sun, having a diameter of 4222 miles (6794 km), a mean distance from the sun of 141.6 million miles (227.9 million km), a period of revolution of 686.95 days, and two moons.

8. Earth, (n.), our home, the third planet from the sun.

What happened to poor old Pluto shouldn’t happen to a dog (7:55).

7 comments:

Pat - Arkansas said...

What! That's all you have to say about Earth? Where are the stats?

I like old cartoons; thanks.

rhymeswithplague said...

Pat, I figured we already knew the stats on Earth: 93,000,000 miles, 365-1/4 days, etc.

A Lady's Life said...

this was so enjoyable I don;t think they can beat these old cartoons
They are the best and always will be.
Thanks :)

Carolina said...

I always thought that she said: "Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou Romeo", not because she didn't know where he was, but because she was slightly desperate that he was Romeo of the Montecchi family.

bARE-eYED sUN said...

and our mooooooon . . . ?

;-)

..
.ero
.p.s. wasn't Pluto Bopeye's nemesis?

..
.

rhymeswithplague said...

Your comments are important to us and will be answered in the order in which they are received. The current wait time is zero seconds.

Pat, I forgot to add 8,000 miles in diameter and 1 moon.

Lady's Life, glad you liked the cartoon! If I remember correctly, it was made in 1934.

Carolina, Carolina, Juliet was a Capulet and Romeo was a Montague. Is Montecchi Dutch for Montague?

bARE-eYED-sUN, nice to see you again. Since you asked two questions, you will receive a two-part answer:

1. Kate Smith sings the answer to your first question (3:05).

2. Popeye's nemesis was Bluto; Pluto was the ninth planet in our solar system from 1930 until 2006.

Carolina said...

Oops, no, it is Italian for Montague. I'm multilingual and often confused as you well know ;-)