Thursday, January 5, 2012

As Epiphany approaches

...let us listen to Kathleen Battle and Frederica von Staade sing, in Italian and Latin, the beautiful “Gesù Bambino” by Pietro Yon.

Miss von Staade was heard to say afterward, “Che manicotti grandi avete, nonna!”

And Miss Battle replied, “Il migliore con quale spingerli verso il fondo della scena, il mio caro!”

Here is the English translation:

Miss von Staade: “What big sleeves you have, Grandma!”

Miss Battle: “The better to upstage you with, my dear!”


Here are Pietro Yon’s original Italian lyrics:

Nell’umile capanna
nel freddo e povertá
é nato il Santo pargolo
che il mondo adorerá

Osanna, osanna cantano
con giubilante cor
i tuoi pastori ed angeli
o re di luce e amor

venite adoremus
venite adoremus
venite adoremus
Dominum

O bel bambin non piangere
non piangere, Redentor!
la mamma tua cullandoti
ti bacia, O Salvator

Osanna, osanna cantano
con giubilante cor
i tuoi pastori ed angeli
o re di luce e amor

venite adoremus
venite adoremus
venite adoremus
Dominum

Ah! venite adoremus
Ah! adoremus Dominum
venite, venite
venite adoremus
adoremus
Dominum


Here are English lyrics by Frederick H. Martens (they are not a literal translation of the Italian):

When blossoms flowered ’mid the snows
Upon a winter night
Was born the Child, the Christmas Rose
The King of Love and Light.

The angels sang, the shepherds sang
The grateful earth rejoiced
And at His blessed birth the stars
Their exultation voiced.

O come let us adore Him
O come let us adore Him
O come let us adore Him
Christ the Lord.

Again the heart with rapture glows
To greet the holy night
That gave the world its Christmas Rose
Its King of Love and Light.

Let ev’ry voice acclaim His name
The grateful chorus swell
From paradise to earth He came
That we with Him might dwell.

O come let us adore Him
O come let us adore Him
O come let us adore Him
Christ the Lord.


Here is a literal translation of the Italian:

In a humble hut
In the cold and poverty
Was born the Holy baby
That the world adores

"Hosanna, Hosanna" sing
With jubilant heart
The shepherds and angels
Of the king of light and love

O come let us adore
O come let us adore
O come let us adore
The Lord.

O beautiful baby, do not cry
Do not cry, Redeemer!
Your mother is rocking
Kisses to you, O Saviour

"Hosanna, Hosanna" sing
With jubilant heart
The shepherds and angels
Of the king of light and love

O come let us adore
O come let us adore
O come let us adore
The Lord


Let’s hear it for poetic license.

Editor’s note. I am absolutely stoked (as the young folks say) to learn that the Italian word for sleeves is manicotti. Perhaps pasta e fagioli means cummerbund.--RWP

6 comments:

Theanne said...

Beautiful music and singing...you're right...those are the biggest puffed sleeves I've ever seen on a dress!

rhymeswithplague said...

Theanne, I agree. How do you manage to sometimes include Baron and sometimes not? I'm guessing two different sign-ons.

Pat - Arkansas said...

A beautiful combination/blending of voices on one of my very favorite songs (hymns?). Thanks for the link.

I think the poufy-sleeved gown is beautiful, manicotti or not.

rhymeswithplague said...

Pat, I didn't mean to insinuate that the gown wasn't beautiful. It is. But those sleeves are in the "wretched excess" category.

Elizabeth said...

Maybe she needed somewhere to put her packed lunch and purse?

rhymeswithplague said...

Elizabeth, LOL!