Tuesday, November 11, 2014

Air Force Blue

(Photo taken at Sheppard Air Force Base, Wichita Falls, Texas, 1961)

10 comments:

Elephant's Child said...

So young, so earnest. Heavy responsibilty rests on those shoulders...

All Consuming said...

Great photograph. Did you send it to Mrs rhymes? I see it's autographed.

rhymeswithplague said...

Elephant's Child (Sue), young, earnest, and incredibly naive, I would say.

All Consuming (Michelle), I did send it to Mrs. Rhymes, but not until a couple of years later. I had not yet met her when the photograph was taken. As an indication of just how young, earnest, and incredibly naive I was, the autograph reads, "Sincerely, Bob"....

LightExpectations said...

Nice! :) Thank you for your service!

Hilltophomesteader said...

Thank you so much for your sacrifice of service, Mr RWP.
My grandfather did not serve in the military, but three of his four sons did. In later years, some of his grandsons served and his two sons-in-law as well. Most men speak very little of their military years, their personal sacrifice great and lingering effects long lasting. Thank you and them, not just for those few short years, but all the other years of your lives that were affected. We have benefited greatly. God bless you.

Yorkshire Pudding said...

What a handsome devil you were sir! If I had been a footloose and fancy free young woman back then I would have picked you up and taken you to Iowa Park for some hanky panky.

rhymeswithplague said...

Thank you, LightExpectations and Hilltophomesteader. I spent nearly 5 years in the U.S. Air Force (Jan. 1961 - Oct. 1965). I am now termed a "Vietnam Era" veteran.

Yorkshire Pudding, I have one more thing to be thankful for this Thanksgiving, that you were not a footloose and fancy free young woman back then. Actually, you would have gotten exactly nowhere with me as I preferred ratatouille to hanky panky.

Snowbrush said...

I wonder if Sheppard still exists. Peggy's father was a career Air Force officer. I decided that I too would join, and he was stationed at nearby Randolph when I reported for basic training at Lackland (the biggest military base in the world, I was told). Peggy was to stay with her parents until I finished basic, but I only lasted 17 days after which I was kicked out for marijuana. It was like a movie about the Old West in that they literally ripped the Air Force insignia off my uniform, and left me to wander around the base in that condition for nearly a week while I was being processed out. My roommate in the old and funky barracks in which the rejects were housed was there for attacking his drill instructor, and he was a scary kind of guy. Then came the coup de gras when Peggy's parents brought her to visit me (people who were being kicked out had no work to do and a lot more freedom than those who did). It was a hard and stupid time in my life, and no doubt in the lives of Peggy's parents too, although Peggy at least took it well enough. It wasn't to be the last disgrace that was brought on by my own foolishness. I wouldn't say that I've made a mess of my life, but I do think that, without the restraining influence of Peggy, I would most likely be dead or in prison because there has been many a time when I didn't do something because I knew it would hurt her.

rhymeswithplague said...

Snowbrush, Our old friend Wikipedia says that Sheppard AFB is still going strong. When I was in basic training at Lackland AFB, our barracks chief, a black guy with inner-city gang experience, was kicked out about halfway through the eight weeks after he and a couple of hand-picked henchmen thoroughly terrorized the rest of us. We heaved a collective sign of relief when he and they were gone. Our drill sergeant hadn't had a clue.

Snowbrush said...

I think that when Peggy's father went through basic it might have been at Sheppard because I'm pretty sure the base he mentioned was in Wichita Falls. This would have been immediately after WWII.