Saturday, July 8, 2017

Turn around and the year is already half over, or time flies even when you're not having fun

The May-June-July Follies have been rather eventful this year even though your correspondent has been blogging less. In this post I will confine myself to the local follies scene as international follies are in a class by themselves and cannot be explained adequately by anyone.

Number Four Grandchild graduated from high school with honors, fifth in his class of nearly two hundred. Come fall we will have four grandchildren attending four different colleges in three different states, with two more grandchildren close behind.

All our chickies were gone at one point. Number One Son's bunch went to Michigan, where, among other activities, they saw three of the five Great Lakes and crossed from the Lower Peninsula to the Upper Peninsula on a very big bridge. Number Two Son's bunch went to Guatemala where, among other activities, they climbed to the top of a volcano and narrowly avoided being affected by an earthquake. Only Daughter's bunch went to Baltimore, Maryland, where, among other activities, they rode in a water taxi from the Inner Harbor to Fort McHenry, the site of the battle with the British in 1814 that inspired Francis Scott Key to write the poem that became our national anthem, "The Star-Spangled Banner."

The old folks, a.k.a. Mom and Dad, a.k.a. Nana and Grandpa, stayed home. They did not go to market, have roast beef, cry "Wee, wee, wee" all the way home, pass GO, or collect $200. Nevertheless, their time was not uneventful.

Dad/Grandpa had adventures of his own. A semi-annual cardiologist appointment revealed that it was time for another stress test, it having been four or five years since the last one occurred. Your correspondent allowed as how he didn't care if he never saw another treadmill. The cardiologist pointed out that there are nuclear stress tests now that involve having a radioactive isotope injected into one's veins to speed up one's heart rate in lieu of the aforementioned treadmill and then one's being surrounded by an MRI-like machine for a few minutes, during which time a geiger counter-like apparatus checks out one's heart. One protested feebly but ultimately agreed to such a procedure.

One got home from this procedure to discover that a medication, isosorbide mononitrate (Imdur, a vaso dilator), had been called in to one's pharmacy. One was a bit alarmed, as one's newest buddy in the medical field, an ophthalmologist in the next county, has been injecting bevacizumab (Avastin) in one's right eye monthly since March, the purpose of which is to shrink, not expand, the blood vessels in one's eye as a treatment for what is called "wet" macular degeneration. It seemed to one (moi) that the Imdur and the Avastin might work at odds to one another.

Subsequently a heart catheterization (British, catheterisation) was recommended and your brave correspondent reluctantly agreed to be subjected to this barbaric procedure also. They didn't like what they found. One was informed that the large artery that enters the heart at the bottom is 80 to 90 per cent blocked, plus there are several smaller blockages that require insertion of "three or four" (forsooth) stents, and heavy blood thinners will be necessary for at least a year.

The heart guy stopped the presses at this point until he could confer with the eye guy. Said conference has now been completed and the verdict is that everything is just hunky-dory for the stent insertions to proceed. I am now waiting to hear from the heart guy's office as to when to report for duty the resumption of the interrupted procedure.

Wish me well. It seems Number One Son's bunch are not the only ones in the family crossing a big bridge.


(Photo by Justin Billau, used in accordance with CC-BY-2.0)

Crossing a big bridge and narrowly avoiding being affected by an earthquake have a lot in common. In light of this astounding revelation, please rise for the singing of "The Star-Spangled Banner."

Can I tie everything up in a neat bow, or what?

13 comments:

Elephant's Child said...

I am sorry to read this. The medical merrygoround isn't fun for those on it, or those watching.
I hope the stents can be inserted quickly, easily and successfully.

Emma Springfield said...

Even though I lived in Michigan a long time I never crossed the Mackinac Bridge. Not me. And I can guarantee I never will. Your offspring all had interesting trips. How nice.

Emma Springfield said...

I wish you well on your medical procedure. My youngest brother who will only be 55 in a few weeks has had stents in all of the arteries to his heart. He feels good good good now. You will too.

rhymeswithplague said...

Sue, merrygoround is certainly an accurate description. I am hoping for those same three adverbs. Thank you for your good wishes as the follies continue.

rhymeswithplague said...

Emma, I have never been across that bridge either, but I have been to the top of the Sears Tower in Chicago and also been through those two tunnel thingies at the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay, which to my mind are pretty good substitutes in the heart-in-the-mouth department.

I had my first heart cath two months before my 55th birthday. I am 76 now. Since they seem to happen every 21 years, I have penciled in another one for when I'm 97.

Hilltophomesteader said...

Bob! Surely you can entertain yourself with something other than exploring various medical procedures! Consider taking up watercolors or a new musical instrument!! I want you to behave yourself and, in all seriousness, I wish you absolutely the quickest and most comfortable recovery possible. You will be in my daily prayers, as will Mrs. RWP, as she will no doubt be concerned for your welfare. I can hardly wait to read your report on "What I Did This Summer"!

rhymeswithplague said...

Pam, apparently What I Did This Summer will report a great deal of waiting. That's what I'm doing now. Waiting and hoping to hear from the doctor's office soon. In the meantime, I am not running any marathons.

Graham Edwards said...

Worry not dear sir. I had a large number of stents in 2000 when such a procedure involved a massive team and 5 hours labour. I have never looked back. I wish you that tiny bit of luck that we all need (even when crossing the road) and hope that you will be firing on all ventricles very quickly.

rhymeswithplague said...

Graham, thanks for the good wishes. I found out earlier today that the procedure will take place on Wednesday morning.

All Consuming said...

I'm not too late to send my love and best wishes then if it's Wednesday! Sorry, poor show at reading here. *looks rubbish*. I'll be thinking of you dearie, it's so close to home with pa as you said, but you are much hardier than he and look around ten years younger too, so you'll be fine I'm sure. Love to Mrs RWP at this time too. Xx

rhymeswithplague said...

Thank you, Michelle, For your kind thoughts and good wishes for Wednesday. It's only a few hours away now.

Yorkshire Pudding said...

I was going to create an amusing allusion to two warriors from science fiction battling for supremacy over Planet Brague - The Mighty Imdur and The Maniacal Avastin. However, when I consider the prospect of your heart surgery I realise that the proper course is to say that I am rooting for you. We may have never met in person but I consider you to be a friend and I want the best for you. The stents will allow you to live way past a hundred. Be brave old chum.

rhymeswithplague said...

Yorkie, my thanks on your ability to restrain yourself and also for the rooting. I suppose that could have been said better but I don't have time to edit myself just now.