Thursday, May 6, 2010

Azanmig, huh?


Can you raed this? Olny 55 plepoe out of 100 can. If you can raed it, you dnot hvae a sgtrane mnid; you are nroaml.

I cdnuolt blveiee taht I cluod aulaclty uesdnatnrd waht I was rdanieg. The phaonmneal pweor of the hmuan mnid, aoccdrnig to a rscheearch taem at Cmabrigde Uinervtisy, it dseno't mtaetr in waht oerdr the ltteres in a wrod are, the olny iproamtnt tihng is taht the frsit and lsat ltteer be in the rghit pclae. The rset can be a taotl mses and you can stlil raed it whotuit a pboerlm. This is bcuseae the huamn mnid deos not raed ervey lteter by istlef, but the wrod as a wlohe. Azanmig, huh? Yaeh, and I awlyas tghuhot slpeling was ipmorantt!

[This piece has made the e-mail rounds a few times, but some may not have seen it before. It is not original with me. In fact, if you look closely, you will see that we have a rscheearch taem at Cmabrigde Uinervtisy to thank. Gotta love them Brits!]

P.S. -- This post is dedicated to my cyberfriend, Mr. David Barlow of Ephraim, Utah, with my solemn promise that I will say no more, ever, about his spelling.

11 comments:

Putz said...

hewy, i couln'd read that[jus kidding}

Rosezilla said...

I have seen this before, but always enjoy reading them because I can read them just as quickly as the normal type! I always thought it was because I'm a typist, and the only way to type quickly is to type whole words and phrases, not letter by letter. Yet, I'm a stickler for spelling anyway.

Pat - Arkansas said...

Vrey itrnestenig.

A Lady's Life said...

It sure makes you feel like you are smart hehehe

Sam said...

I cuodlnt udnrstdn a wrod...

Putz said...

well got ya back, on my blog, siisy says you are being mean to me, but id do understand you..i do

Yorkshire Pudding said...

Fascinating Robert but this phrase - "Gotta love them Brits!" is one that I personally take exception to. How long has this term "Brit" been around? It's not one that I would ever use myself. I am first of all a Yorkshireman and then an Englishman. I object to being lumped together with the Welsh, Scottish and Northern Irish. Employing the term "Brit", you might as well call me a skunk or a hobo.

rhymeswithplague said...

I would certainly never call you a skunk or a hobo. A [*censored*] maybe, but never a skunk or a hobo.

I used the term Brit to mean "an inhabitant of the British Isles" -- which you are. We are Americans, and also Californians, Georgians, Ohioans, and so forth. By calling yourself "first of all a Yorkshireman" you are very much cut out of the same cloth as our General Robert E. Lee, a West Point graduate who was offered command of both the Union and the Confederate armies at the beginning of our Civil War, but chose to lead the South because he was, first of all, a Virginian.

Snowbrush said...

But how does this differ from your usual writing? Ha.

I could read it well enough. The important thing is to not study the individual words but just to read straight through as if everything was normal.

Egghead said...

I have seen this as well. Very interesting.

Anonymous said...

Robert, Interesting, would serve us well to use this as a proper diction teaching tool in correctly and clearly pronouncing letters to simply be understood. Examples, to pronounce "r" sound instead of omitting it ("four" sounding like having a speech impediment: "fo"), to not roll the "r" (sounds like "drdrdrdr" or "dddd" depending on speaker), and "v" isn't supposed to sound like "w" ("wedddy mPOtnT fo yo Elth ISSSSues" my former Doctor said). My former dentist's hygienist mumbled, unknown, weird immediate instruction to "too-TthDrdrdrdrIEEEEE!!!" (no clue at an intense moment) - REALLY messed up my dental procedure. It's entertaining that candidates with poor speech patterns truly believe they are qualified to speak: to teach or speak with employees/customers/vendors/students/patients, and think they will get a job interview! WOW, Lots of call center reps desperately need diction lessons. It's just sad that people attempting to speak English don't know Simple diction and phonics that most people I know began learning at home, before being old enough to enroll in school.
I should ask the rscheearch taem at Cmabdrdrdrdigde UineVUHHtisy to study people choosing to use poor speech. Cool that American Southerners are all easy to understand. No, I've never lived in the south and not a teacher - just fed up with this in communication in business and personal life, and it's just getting worse.
Hey, Yorkshire Pudding... I just have to ask, are you from Yorkshire county, isn't it the largest in Great Britain?... "Brit" sounds like a positive, respectful term. No pride in citizenship or reference of location? I'm fortunate that I am a proud, loyal American first, only, and always. (Not: American-SomeWhoCaresOtherCountry and especially not hyphenated in reverse as a bogus-American!) My state, county, city, lineage countries of origin (not on any options list-Good!), eye color, etc. are irrelevant, and I'm glad! As lucky to be an American, we have privilege, freedom, and choice to live here or not; making each, freedom and choice, a privilege in itself - awesome how that works for each of us. BTW, Yorkshire is also a town in the state of New York, United States.