Friday, January 25, 2013

An unexpected find

Here is a powerful performance of a powerful song from a slip of a girl.

It’s Bernadette Peters singing “Unexpected Song” by Sir Andrew Lloyd Webber at Royal Festival Hall, London, in 2008 (5:19).

If you want to talk about Bernadette’s height (5 feet, 3 inches) or her age (she will be 65 on February 28, 2013) or the length of her career (five decades) or her powerful voice (she was 60 when she did this concert), be my guest.

If, after watching the video, you want to talk about anything else of Bernadette’s, please remember that this is a family-friendly blog and keep your observations to yourself.

You can read more about Bernadette Peters here.

(Peters on the Tim Conway Show, 1977)

6 comments:

Reamus said...

I am not at all clear why, but Ms. Peters always annoyed me. Her voice sounds like that of a child.
Just me I suppose, the rest of the world seems to find her acceptable.

Snowbrush said...

Hard to imagine she was 55.

All Consuming said...

I absolutely loved her in 'Into The Woods' as the witch. And I've heard her sing many songs from musicals as my dad is a big fan too. She's a clever actress and singer with a great voice.

rhymeswithplague said...

Reamus, if Bernadette Peters annoys you, you should try Roberta (6:34).

Snowbrush, she has certainly aged well.

All Consuming, thanks for dropping by and leaving a comment! I love Into the Woods also. I peeked at your profile and saw that one of your favorite movies is Harold and Maude. Mine, too! But I like Raising Arizona even better.

Eagle said...

Since we are talking theater, this is one of my favorite Sondheim songs.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iQDiKGRut80

Good anthem! Or as they say in the Book of Mormon..."Hasa Diga Ebowei!"

rhymeswithplague said...

Eagle, welcome to my blog!

I have always loved "Send in the Clowns" and this is a beautiful rendition. But Sally Anne Howes is frozen in my mind as Truly Scrumptious in Chitty Chitty Bang Bang" plus somehow with the passing of time she seems to have become a mezzo-soprano.