Friday, July 19, 2019

I learned a new word this week

siniristilippu

SINIRISTILIPPU

Without googling it or looking it up in an authoritative reference source, give us a guess as to what you think siniristilippu means.

I'll give you a hint. It has something to do with Finland.

Is it A, the Finnish flag?


Is it B, this Finnish favourite, a delicious split pea soup?


Or is it C, this charming Finnish folk dance (3:09)?

Go to the comments section and state your choice, along with your reason for choosing it, now. Then come back and read the rest of the post.

I have met two people from Finland in real life, and a third person whom I knew only through cyberspace.

The first was my French teacher at university, Mme. Deschner. She was from Helsinki and had studied French in Switzerland. She was a lovely woman whose accent when speaking English was quite charming. To me she sounded like Ingrid Bergman. I was sure that when I spoke French it would be with a Finnish-Swiss accent. At the end of the semester Mme. Deschner told me I sounded Parisian, quite cosmopolitan. I wonder why.

The second is a man in our church, Wayne Rasku, who moved to Georgia from Pompano Beach, Florida. Turns out we know some of the same people.

The third, my cyberspace-only friend, was Dr. John Linna, a Lutheran pastor from Neenah, Wisconsin, who died several years ago. His blog was charming (there’s that word again) because it contained not only talking dragons but also a whole village in his basement. Dr. John wove wonderful tales and I miss him.

Now to reveal the answer to our little quiz. It will be obvious when I tell you that in Finnish sini means blue, risti means cross, and lippu means flag.

Blue Cross Flag.

The answer is A.

Siniristilippu!

For your information, the split pea soup is called hernekeitto and the dance is called rihmarulla.

Now we are completely Finnished, er, finished.

8 comments:

  1. With your French heritage - embodied in your surname - I am sure that you already knew that the word "Fin" in French means "End". Therefore Finland must mean Endland which sounds very much like England. Funny how things connect.

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  2. You spoiled all my fun. I was going to give you some drivel about a left-handed flower that could fertilize itelf.

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  3. Had a terrific Finnish guy marry into the family. He left us far too soon. There are quite a few Finnish people who live in this area.

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  4. The word sounds more like a dance than like a flag or a soup, although I would prefer the soup despite the fact that it has a worm in it.

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  5. Since I speak no Finnish, but like to eat....I'll go with the soup. And, can I have some rustic Peasant bread with lots of real butter on the side to dip in it? We'll talk about dessert later....

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  6. It has to be the soup. Why? Because it's not the flag and you would have finished the dance before it had finished being announced.

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  7. Oh. I could not have been more incorrect if I'd tried.

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  8. My thanks to everyone who participated! I hope you had fun.

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