Friday, September 24, 2021

This one's for kylie

Below is one example of the many Type 2 hymns "swirling in the nether parts of my brain" (as Neil Theasby aka Yorkshire Pudding said in his comment on the previous post in reference to Church of England hymns (undoubtedly Type 1) he sang as a boy as a member of his local church choir).

It happens to be "Love, Mercy, And Grace", the hymn my late friend Walter, his wife Margaret, and I (note Oxford comma) sang from memory one evening about 15 years ago in the parking lot of a local Waffle House restaurant.

Please note also that I was correct: it is #153 in the Cokesbury Hymnal (Methodist):

Oddly enough, even though #153 was often called out from the congregation of the little Methodist church I attended in Mansfield, Texas (which now has over 3,000 members) during our Sunday evening evangelistic services, I have no recollection, absolutely none whatsoever, of the next hymn, #154.

Here endeth my foray into hymns of my childhood.

And all the readers said, "Thanks be to God."

10 comments:

  1. My grandfather's family was Church of England, my grandmother's Wesleyan Methodist They were not encouraged.

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    1. Tasker, I don’t understand what point you are trying to make. Every person is different and reacts differently.. Some people like chocolate ice cream; some people like vanilla ice cream. Some people don’t like either one. My mother was raised in Judaism. I was raised in Christianity. My dad used to say, “If everyone else jumped off a cliff, does that mean you have to jump off a cliff too?” We each must come to our own individual conclusions. I won’t denigrate yours and I trust you won’t denigrate mine.

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  2. As I said before I don't recognize the hymns you listed. I know many but not those.

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    1. Emma, I may be wrong, but did you mean to put this comment on the previous post?

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  3. Robert, I'm honoured to have a post written for me.
    The words are full of truth and I love songs with that echo effect. Is it called a counter part? My whole family is musical and would be horrified by my asking 🤣
    You mention that you don't recall people calling out #154. How I miss those days when we would sing favourites.

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    1. kylie, It was my pleasure and you are deserving. Many hymns of the revivalistic era employed echo singing, and that is the correct term for the style. I don’t know what you mean by counter part, but if you were thinking of counterpoint, no, this hymn is not an example of that. Counterpoint is something else, rather like melodies competing simultaneously.

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  4. Also, 154 is a wonderful song but I think we use a different tune

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    1. kylie, as I indicated, #154 is unknown to me. I see it has words by Alexander Pope.

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  5. It's nice to have had a name check in this blogpost. Now I feel quite important. Readers of "Rhymes With Plague" should note that I charge reasonable fees for birthdays, weddings, funerals and bar mitzvahs.

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  6. Yorkshire Pudding, what about anniversaries?

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